303.842.8255 | 400 McCaslin Boulevard, Suite 210, Louisville, CO 80027

I often suggest parsnip as a food that can pass for kids with FPIES, on low FODMAPs diets, or who have poor tolerance to grains. Yuck, right? Wrong. This recipe is yummy.

Parsnips are good on their own, especially when you can find hefty, fresh, organic parsnips (try roasting then mashing). But they seem doubly good when you combine them with New Jersey white/yellow sweet potato as in this recipe below.

But aren’t these “bad” carbs? Carbs that can trigger yeast and dysbiosis? Nope. These are lower FODMAPs carbs that are mostly digested in the upper small intestine, and thus can’t feed fungal or other undesirable species that are usually reside further down the gut. In some cases, kids who have SIBO or SIFO may struggle with this food, but it is still worth a trial to introduce it, especially for those struggling to gain weight.

KidsĀ need carbohydrates to gain weight. One of the biggest mistake I see in the foodie GAPS-and-Weston-Price crowd is giving kids too much protein, too much fat, and too few carbs. What happens in that scenario is that protein is misappropriated for energy at great cost to your child’s body. Using protein for energy is inefficient and taxing to liver and kidney; it skews mineral balance and leaches calcium from bone; and it can cause stunting.

If a child isn’t thriving on GAPS or any special diet approach, it’s time for a different approach. Your kid should be growing, glowing, happy, sleeping well, playing, eating heartily, getting few to no illnesses and infections, and of course, pooping comfortably every day.

Back to parsnips. Try them. They are lightly sweet. If that isn’t tasty enough, try them as shown below, mashed with New Jersey white (aka yellow) sweet potato. If you’re confused about sweet potatoes, you’re not alone – there are many types. I find the New Jersey ones at our local Natural Grocers chain, which only sells organic produce. They are delicious and also lightly sweet. The two together are lovely! This recipe is good for infants introducing solids, and a great satisfying carbohydrate overall – not to mention, it’s a Thanksgiving favorite in my house.

Parsnip and White Sweet Potato Mash
Print Recipe
Delicately sweet, hard to stop eating! If you have found good organic parsnip and sweet potato, there is no need at all for any seasoning. For kids needing extra boosts, you can add ghee, butter, collagen, breast milk for babies starting solids - all will taste good. A dash of cinnamon may be welcome for some kids too.
Servings Prep Time
6-8 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 minutes 20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6-8 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 minutes 20 minutes
Parsnip and White Sweet Potato Mash
Print Recipe
Delicately sweet, hard to stop eating! If you have found good organic parsnip and sweet potato, there is no need at all for any seasoning. For kids needing extra boosts, you can add ghee, butter, collagen, breast milk for babies starting solids - all will taste good. A dash of cinnamon may be welcome for some kids too.
Servings Prep Time
6-8 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 minutes 20 minutes
Servings Prep Time
6-8 servings 10 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
20 minutes 20 minutes
Ingredients
Servings: servings
Instructions
  1. Wash and peel the parsnips and the sweet potatoes.
  2. Chop them into large chunks or segments, about 2-3" pieces.
  3. Place all in a pot on stove, and add just enough water to barely cover them.
  4. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low boil/simmer. Cook til soft when poked with knife, about 20 minutes.
  5. Remove from heat, and drain the water off, reserving it.
  6. With a hand held masher, mash and blend the parsnip and sweet potato in the pot. When combined enough, use a hand held electric mixer to blend further. Add back as much of the cooking water as you like to get texture as soft as you like. Serve and enjoy!
Share this Recipe

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

I invite you to sign up for my newsletter. Every couple of weeks I will share tips on how to help your child learn, grow, and thrive through nutrition.

You have Successfully Subscribed!